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Dr FRYER, Luke

Personal Particulars

Dr FRYER, Luke

Ph.D. (USYD)

Associate Professor

Human Communication, Development, and Information Sciences

Tel: (852) 3917 4774

Location: Room CPD 1.80, Centennial Campus

Areas of Expertise:

Educational Psychology; Educational Technology; Higher Education; Language Learning at school; Quantitative Methods

Areas of Expertise

1. Educational Psychology (Motivation, Beliefs and Learning Strategies)

2. Educational Technology (Persistence and AI)

3. Higher Education (Quality Assurance, Engagement and Student Experience)

4. Learning a new language at school (Individual differences and Learning a new language at school)

5. Quantitative Methods (Micro-analytic, Experimental–natural settings–, Longitudinal Variable and Person-centered latent modelling)

Awards

2019 (August 30): Patent awarded for a touch device interface for mobile devices (Patent number # 6585129)

CITATION: Fryer, L. K. & Fryer, K. (2019, Sept 19).情報処理装置、情報プログラ ムおよびこれを記録した記録媒体、ならびに情報 処理方法. Patent application # 2017–165970  Patent # 6585129 (Japan). [Dynamic touch based interface for survey self-report; Translation of Japanese patent title: information processor (information technology equipment), information program and a medium for the recording, and a method of information processing]

2019 (Jan-March) - Hughes Hall Research Fellowship, Cambridge University, UK. An award to support full-time research on my programme, work with UK collaborators and share my  work with Cambridge researchers.

2018 (April- May)- Visiting Researcher, Waseda University, Japan. An award to support my work on a national grant with three junior high school in Japan (Japanese National Government “Grant-In-Aid”)

2015 (January) - 2016 (September) -Thomas and Ethel Mary Ewing Postdoctoral Scholarship: A research grant to enable full-time work on my program of research into interest, goals, study/learning strategies and online learning.

2015 (October)- Mobile Application Award of Excellence. Awarded by the Japanese National Mobile Application Development Challenge Contest for an App developed with two honours students (studying Computer Sciences) to collect micro-analytic data through Apple devices (iphones, ipads and iwatches).  

2015 (August)- SELF Network Commended Ph.D. Dissertation. Awarded a commendation for the quality of my dissertation, SELF Biennial Conference, Kiel Germany, August 2015.

 

Projects

1. Getting interested at school

AIMS: Make interest research of greater practical use to educators by modelling the interconnections between specific classroom experiences and the development of students' personal interest in educational domains of learning. 

Key Project Outputs:

1. Fryer, L. K., Ainley, M. & Thompson, A. (2016). Modeling the links between students’ interest in a domain, the tasks they experience and their interest in a course: Isn’t interest what university is all about? Learning and Individual differences. 50, 57-165 doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2016.08.011

2.  Fryer, L. K., Ainley, M., Thompson, A., Gibson, A., & Sherlock, Z. (2017). Stimulating and sustaining interest in a language course: An experimental comparison of Chatbot and Human task partners. Computers in Human Behavior, 75, 461-468. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2017.05.045

Related supportive research outputs:

1.Fryer, L. K. & Ainley, M. (2019). Supporting interest in a study domain: A longitudinal test of the interplay between interest, utility-value, and competence beliefs. Learning and Instruction. 60, 252-262. doi: 10.1016/j.learninstruc.2017.11.002

2. Fryer, L. K. , & Bovee, H. N. (2020) Teaching for course interest. Studies in Higher Education. doi:10.1080/03075079.2020.1712692

Ongoing Research outputs:

1. Fryer, L. K., Zeng, L., Shum, A., Wong, C. W., Ho, C. (2019). Democratising the course experience: Assessing and sharing “on-task” learning experiences. Poster presented at the WERA Focal Meeting 2019, Tokyo, Japan, August 5-8, 2019. doi: 10.13140/RG.2.2.34831.74402/1-- Currently under review for publication

2.Finding classroom tasks interesting: Prior Knowledge, Interest and implications for future interest. (2020). International Conference on Motivation (EARI SIG 8). Dresden, Germany.  --Currently under review for publication

 

2.Learning strategies development 

AIMS: Expand current conceptions of students' learning strategies through novel research design/analyses and  by integrating longstanding, overlapping models.

Key Project Outputs:

1. Fryer, L. K., Ginns, P. & Walker, R. A. (2016). Reciprocal modelling of students’ regulation strategies and motivational deficits for studying. Learning and Individual Differences. 51, 220-228. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2016.08.032

2. Fryer, L. K. (2017). Building bridges: Seeking structure and direction for motivated learning strategy models. Educational Psychology Review. 29, 325-344. doi: 10.1007/s10648-017-9405-7

3.  Fryer, L. K. (2017). (Latent) transitions to learning at university: A latent profile transition analysis of first-year Japanese students. Higher Education. 73, 519-537. doi: 10.1007/s10734-016-0094-9     

4 . Fryer, L. K. & Vermunt, J. D. (2018). Regulating approaches to learning: Testing learning strategy convergences across a year at university. British Journal of Educational Psychology. 88, 21-41. doi: 10.1111/bjep.12169

5.Fryer, L. K. &  Ginns, P. (2018). A reciprocal test of perceptions of teaching quality and approaches to learning: A longitudinal examination of teaching-learning connections. Educational Psychology. 8.1032-1049. doi: 10.1080/01443410.2017.1403568.

6. Dinsmore, D. & Fryer, L. K. (2019). Developing learners’ cognitive strategies and the  motivations to use them: Rethinking Education Policy. Policy Insights from Behavioral and Brain Science. doi: 10.1177/2372732219860862

7.Fryer, L. K., & Shum, A. (2020). Person-centered approaches to explaining students’ cognitive processing strategies. In D. L. Dinsmore, L. K. Fryer, & M. M. Parkinson (Eds.), Handbook of strategies and strategic processing: Conceptualization, measurement, and analysis. New York: Routledge.

Ongoing Research outputs:

1. Fryer, L. K. & Dinsmore D. (2017). Integrating Models of Domain Learning and Student Approaches to Learning perspective on processing: A theoretical framework for new measures and learning. A seminar presented to the Learning Strategies in Social and informal Learning Contexts research group. Bruges, Belgium. November, 22-24.

2. Fryer L. K. & Dinsmore, D. (2018). A hybrid strategic cognitive processing model: Developmental and environmental. A poster presented at EARIL SIG 4 Conference Topography of research on higher education: Promoting deep conversations, 29-31 August, 2018.

3. Dinsmore, D. L. & Fryer, L. K. (2020) Bridging Models of Motivation, Cognitive, and Metacognitive Processing. Paper to be presentation at SIG 8 Meets SIG 16 Dresden 2020, DGUV Congress, Dresden, Germany, Sept 3-8, 2020.

3. Learning with Bots

AIMS:  Explore the growing (endless) potential of AI (bots) as learning partners.

Key Project Outputs:

 1. Fryer, L. K., & Carpenter, R. (2006). Bots as language learning tools. Language Learning and Technology, 10, 8-14. Permanent Online Location: llt.msu.edu/vol10num3/emerging/

2.Fryer, L. K., Ainley, M., Thompson, A., Gibson, A., & Sherlock, Z. (2017). Stimulating and sustaining interest in a language course: An experimental comparison of Chatbot and Human task partners. Computers in Human Behavior, 75, 461-468. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2017.05.045

3. Fryer, L. K., Nakao, K. & Thompson, A. (2019). Chatbot learning partners: Connecting learning experiences, interest and competence. Computers in Human Behaviour. 93,279-289. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2018.12.023

4. Fryer, L. K., Thompson, A., Nakao, K., Howarth, M., & Gallacher, A. (2020). Supporting self-efficacy beliefs and interest as educational inputs and outcomes: Framing AI and Human partnered task experience. Learning and Individual Differences. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2020.101850

4. Fryer, L. K., Coniam, D., Carpenter, R., and Lăpușneanu, D. (2020, June). Bots for language learning now. Language Learning and Technology. 24(3).

4. Assessing  university student experiences

AIMS: Research towards the effective and culturally meaningful assessment of university student experiences

Key Project Outputs:

1.Fryer, L. K., Ginns, P., Walker, R. W., & Nakao, K. (2012). The adaptation and validation of the CEQ and the R-SPQ-2F to the Japanese tertiary environment. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 82, 549-563. doi: 10.1111/j.2044-8279.2011.02045.x

3. Fryer, L. K. (2017). (Latent) transitions to learning at university: A latent profile transition analysis of first-year Japanese students. Higher Education. 73, 519-537. doi: 10.1007/s10734-016-0094-9     

2. Fryer, L. K. &  Ginns, P. (2018). A reciprocal test of perceptions of teaching quality and approaches to learning: A longitudinal examination of teaching-learning connections. Educational Psychology. 8.1032-1049. doi: 10.1080/01443410.2017.1403568.

Related supportive research outputs:

1. Fryer, L. K. & Gijbels, D. (2017). Student learning in higher education: Where we are and paths forward. Educational Psychology Review. 29, 199-203. doi: 10.1007/s10648-017-9415-5

2. Fryer, L. K. (2017). Building bridges: Seeking structure and direction for motivated learning strategy models. Educational Psychology Review. 29, 325-344. doi: 10.1007/s10648-017-9405-7

 Ongoing Research outputs:

1. Zeng, L., Fryer, L. K. & Zhao, M. (2020). A combined approach to assessing students’ university and programme experiences: A pilot study. HERDSA, Brisbane, Australia, June 30 - July 3.--Under review for publication

2. Zeng, L., Fryer, L. K. & Zhao, M. (2020). Assessing university student experience with an integrated and democratic approach for quality assurance and enhancement. HERDSA, Brisbane, Australia, June 30 - July 3. -- under review for publication 

Recent National Grant Support:

2019-2021 561,000 HKD. Diversity of University Engagement across Greater China. The grant covers materials and research assistants. From the Hong Kong General Research Fund (project #17615218).—Primary Investigator

 

Publications

BY YEAR:

 

2020

Fryer, L. K., Coniam, D., Carpenter, R., & Lăpușneanu, D. (2020). Bots for language learning now: Current and future directions. Language Learning & Technology, 24(2), 8–22. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10125/44719

Leenknecht, M. Loyens, S. &  Fryer, L. K. (2020). Formative assessment as practice: The Role of students’ motivation.Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education. doi:  https://doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2020.1765228

Fryer, L. K., Thompson, A., Nakao, K., Howarth, M., & Gallacher, A. (2020). Supporting self-efficacy beliefs and interest as educational inputs and outcomes: Framing AI and Human partnered task experience. Learning and Individual Differences. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2020.101850

Fryer, L. K. & Dinsmore, D. L. (2020). The Promise and Pitfalls of Self-report: Development, research design and analysis issues, and multiple methods. Frontline Learning Research. doi: https://doi.org/10.14786/flr.v8i3.623

Oga-baldwin, W. L. & Fryer, L. K. (2020). Girls show better quality motivation to learn languages than boys: Latent profiles and their gender differences. Heliyon. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e04054

Fryer, L. K. & Nakao, K. (2020). The Future of Survey Self-report: An experimental test of  Likert, VAS, Slide, & “Swipe” touch interfaces. FrontLine Learning Research. doi: https://doi.org/10.14786/flr.v8i2.502 

Oga-Baldwin & Fryer, L. K. (2020). Profiles of language learning motivation: Are new and own languages different? Learning and Individual Differences.doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2020.101852

Fryer, L. K. , & Bovee, H. N. (2020) Teaching for course interest. Studies in Higher Education.doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2020.1712692

2019

Shum, A. & Fryer, L. K. (2019). Impact Of A Short Teaching And Learning Communication Skills Training Course: Research Postgraduate Students' (RPgs) Transitions In Teaching And Learning. Asian Journal of Scholarship of Teaching9(2). 97-118.

Oga-Baldwin, W. L. Q., Fryer, L. K. & Larson-Hall, J. (2019). The critical role of the individual in language education: New directions from the learning sciences. System. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2019.102118

Fryer, L. K. (2019). Getting interested in learning a language at school: Developing a sustainable source of classroom engagement. System. doi: https://doi.org/ 10.1016/j.system.2019.102120

Dinsmore, D. & Fryer, L. K. (2019). Developing learners’ cognitive strategies and the  motivations to use them: Rethinking Education Policy. Policy Insights from Behavioral and Brain Science. doi: 10.1177/2372732219860862

Fryer, L. K. & Oga-Baldwin, W. (2019). Succeeding at junior high school: Students’ reasons, their reach and the teaching that h(inders)elps their grasp. Contemporary Educational Psychology. 59  doi: /10.1016/j.cedpsych.2019.101778. 

Fryer, L. K., Nakao, K. & Thompson, A. (2019). Chatbot learning partners: Connecting learning experiences, interest and competence. Computers in Human Behaviour. 93,279-289. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2018.12.023

Fryer, L. K. & Ainley, M. (2019). Supporting interest in a study domain: A longitudinal test of the interplay between interest, utility-value, and competence beliefs. Learning and Instruction. 60, 252-262. doi:10.1016/j.learninstruc.2017.11.002

2018

Fryer, L. K. &  Ginns, P. (2018). A reciprocal test of perceptions of teaching quality and approaches to learning: A longitudinal examination of teaching-learning connections. Educational Psychology. 8.1032-1049. doi:10.1080/01443410.2017.1403568.

Oga-Baldwin, W. L. Q. & Fryer, L. K. (2018). Schools can improve motivational quality: Profile transitions across early foreign language learning experiences. Motivation and Emotion. 42. 527-545. doi: 10.1007/s11031-018-9681-7

Fryer, L. K. & Bovee, H. N. (2018). Staying motivated to e-learn: Person- and variable-centred perspectives on the longitudinal risks and support. Computers and Education. 120, 227-240 doi: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.01.006

Fryer, L. K., Ginns, P., Howarth, M., Anderson, C. J., & Ozono, S. (2018). Modelling students’ individual differences in attendance: Why do students skip class? Educational Psychology. 38, 470-486. doi: 10.1080/01443410.2017.1403567

Dinsmore, D. & Fryer, L. K. (2018). The Intersection between depth and the regulation of strategy use. British Journal of Educational Psychology. 88, 1-8. doi: 10.1111/bjep.12209

Fryer, L. K. & Vermunt, J. D. (2018). Regulating approaches to learning: Testing learning strategy convergences across a year at university. British Journal of Educational Psychology. 88, 21-41. doi: 10.1111/bjep.12169

2017

Fryer, L. K. & Oga-baldwin, W. (2017). One more reason to learn a new language: Testing academic self-efficacy transfer during first year at junior high school. Frontline Learning Research. 5, 61-75. doi: 10.14786/flr.v5i4.301

 Fryer, L. K., Ainley, M., Thompson, A., Gibson, A., & Sherlock, Z. (2017). Stimulating and sustaining interest in a language course: An experimental comparison of Chatbot and Human task partners. Computers in Human Behavior, 75, 461-468. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2017.05.045

 Fryer, L. K. & Gijbels, D. (2017). Student learning in higher education: Where we are and paths forward. Educational Psychology Review. 29, 199-203. doi: 10.1007/s10648-017-9415-5

 Fryer, L. K. (2017). (Latent) transitions to learning at university: A latent profile transition analysis of first-year Japanese students. Higher Education. 73, 519-537. doi: 10.1007/s10734-016-0094-9     

Fryer, L. K. (2017). Building bridges: Seeking structure and direction for motivated learning strategy models.Educational Psychology Review. 29, 325-344. doi: 10.1007/s10648-017-9405-7

2016

 Fryer, L. K., Ginns, P. & Walker, R. A. (2016). Reciprocal modelling of students’ regulation strategies and motivational deficits for studying. Learning and Individual Differences. 51, 220-228. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2016.08.032

 Fryer, L. K., Van den Broeck, A. Ginns, P. & Nakao, K. (2016). Understanding students’ instrumental goals, motivation deficits and achievement: Through the Lens of a latent profile analysis. Psychologica Belgica, 56, 226–243, doi: 10.5334/pb.265

 Fryer, L. K., Ainley, M. & Thompson, A. (2016). Modeling the links between students’ interest in a domain, the tasks they experience and their interest in a course: Isn’t interest what university is all about? Learning and Individual differences. 50, 57-165 doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2016.08.011

 Fryer, L. K., & Bovee, H. N. (2016). Supporting students’ motivation for e-learning assignments: Teachers matter on and offline. Internet and Higher Education. 30, 21-29. doi: 10.1016/j.iheduc.2016.03.003

≤2015

 Fryer, L. K. (2015). Predicting self-concept, interest and achievement for first-year university students: The seeds of lifelong learning. Learning and Individual Differences, 38, 107-114. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2015.01.007

Ginns, P., Loughland A., Tierney, R. J., Fryer, L. K., Amazan R., & McCormick, A. (2015). Evaluation of the Learning to Teach for Social Justice–Beliefs Scale in an Australian context. Higher Education Research & Development, 34, 311-323. doi: 10.1080/07294360.2014.956701

 Fryer, L. K., Ginns, P. & Walker, R. (2014). Between students' instrumental goals and how they learn: Goal content is the gap to mind. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 84, 612-30. doi: 10.1111/bjep.12052.

Fryer, L. K., Bovee, H. N., & Nakao, K. (2014). E-learning: Reasons language students don't want to. Computers & Education, 74, 26-36. doi: 10.1016/j.compedu.2014.01.008

Fryer. L. K., Carter, P., Ozono, S., Nakao, K., & Anderson, C. J. (2013) Instrumental reasons for studying in compulsory English courses: I didn’t come to university to study English, so why should I? Innovation in Language Learning and Teaching. 8, 239-256 doi: 10.1080/17501229.2013.835314

Fryer, L. K., Ginns, P., Walker, R. W., & Nakao, K. (2012). The adaptation and validation of the CEQ and the R-SPQ-2F to the Japanese tertiary environment. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 82, 549-563. doi: 10.1111/j.2044-8279.2011.02045.x

 Fryer, L. K., & Carpenter, R. (2006). Bots as language learning tools. Language Learning and Technology, 10, 8-14. Permanent Online Location: llt.msu.edu/vol10num3/emerging/

========================================================================================================

BY TOPIC:

 

Motivations 2 Learn

Fryer, L. K., Thompson, A., Nakao, K., Howarth, M., & Gallacher, A. (2020). Supporting self-efficacy beliefs and interest as educational inputs and outcomes: Framing AI and Human partnered task experience. Learning and Individual Differences. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2020.101850

Oga-Baldwin & Fryer, L. K. (2020). Profiles of language learning motivation: Are new and own languages different? Learning and Individual Differences.doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2020.101852

Fryer, L. K. & Oga-Baldwin, W. (2019). Succeeding at junior high school: Students’ reasons, their reach and the teaching that h(inders)elps their grasp. Contemporary Educational Psychology. 59  doi: /10.1016/j.cedpsych.2019.101778. 

Fryer, L. K. & Ainley, M. (2019). Supporting interest in a study domain: A longitudinal test of the interplay between interest, utility-value, and competence beliefs. Learning and Instruction. 60, 252-262. doi:10.1016/j.learninstruc.2017.11.002

Oga-Baldwin, W. L. Q. & Fryer, L. K. (2018). Schools can improve motivational quality: Profile transitions across early foreign language learning experiences. Motivation and Emotion. 42. 527-545. doi: 10.1007/s11031-018-9681-7

Fryer, L. K., Ginns, P., Howarth, M., Anderson, C. J., & Ozono, S. (2018). Modelling students’ individual differences in attendance: Why do students skip class? Educational Psychology. 38, 470-486. doi: 10.1080/01443410.2017.1403567

Fryer, L. K. & Oga-baldwin, W. (2017). One more reason to learn a new language: Testing academic self-efficacy transfer during first year at junior high school. Frontline Learning Research. 5, 61-75. doi: 10.14786/flr.v5i4.301

 Fryer, L. K., Van den Broeck, A. Ginns, P. & Nakao, K. (2016). Understanding students’ instrumental goals, motivation deficits and achievement: Through the Lens of a latent profile analysis. Psychologica Belgica, 56, 226–243, doi: 10.5334/pb.265

 Fryer, L. K. (2015). Predicting self-concept, interest and achievement for first-year university students: The seeds of lifelong learning. Learning and Individual Differences, 38, 107-114. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2015.01.007

 

Getting Interested in Learning

Fryer, L. K., Thompson, A., Nakao, K., Howarth, M., & Gallacher, A. (2020). Supporting self-efficacy beliefs and interest as educational inputs and outcomes: Framing AI and Human partnered task experience. Learning and Individual Differences. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2020.101850

Fryer, L. K. , & Bovee, H. N. (2020) Teaching for course interest. Studies in Higher Education.doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2020.1712692

Fryer, L. K., Nakao, K. & Thompson, A. (2019). Chatbot learning partners: Connecting learning experiences, interest and competence. Computers in Human Behaviour. 93,279-289. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2018.12.023

Fryer, L. K. & Ainley, M. (2019). Supporting interest in a study domain: A longitudinal test of the interplay between interest, utility-value, and competence beliefs. Learning and Instruction. 60, 252-262. doi:10.1016/j.learninstruc.2017.11.002

 Fryer, L. K., Ainley, M., Thompson, A., Gibson, A., & Sherlock, Z. (2017). Stimulating and sustaining interest in a language course: An experimental comparison of Chatbot and Human task partners. Computers in Human Behavior, 75, 461-468. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2017.05.045

 Fryer, L. K., Ainley, M. & Thompson, A. (2016). Modeling the links between students’ interest in a domain, the tasks they experience and their interest in a course: Isn’t interest what university is all about? Learning and Individual differences. 50, 57-165 doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2016.08.011

 Fryer, L. K. (2015). Predicting self-concept, interest and achievement for first-year university students: The seeds of lifelong learning. Learning and Individual Differences, 38, 107-114. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2015.01.007

 

Learning Strategies

Shum, A. & Fryer, L. K. (2019). Impact Of A Short Teaching And Learning Communication Skills Training Course: Research Postgraduate Students' (RPgs) Transitions In Teaching And Learning. Asian Journal of Scholarship of Teaching9(2). 97-118.

Dinsmore, D. & Fryer, L. K. (2019). Developing learners’ cognitive strategies and the  motivations to use them: Rethinking Education Policy. Policy Insights from Behavioral and Brain Science. doi: 10.1177/2372732219860862

Fryer, L. K. &  Ginns, P. (2018). A reciprocal test of perceptions of teaching quality and approaches to learning: A longitudinal examination of teaching-learning connections. Educational Psychology. 8.1032-1049. doi:10.1080/01443410.2017.1403568.

Dinsmore, D. & Fryer, L. K. (2018). The Intersection between depth and the regulation of strategy use. British Journal of Educational Psychology. 88, 1-8. doi: 10.1111/bjep.12209

Fryer, L. K. & Vermunt, J. D. (2018). Regulating approaches to learning: Testing learning strategy convergences across a year at university. British Journal of Educational Psychology. 88, 21-41. doi: 10.1111/bjep.12169

 Fryer, L. K. (2017). (Latent) transitions to learning at university: A latent profile transition analysis of first-year Japanese students. Higher Education. 73, 519-537. doi: 10.1007/s10734-016-0094-9     

 Fryer, L. K., Ginns, P. & Walker, R. A. (2016). Reciprocal modelling of students’ regulation strategies and motivational deficits for studying. Learning and Individual Differences. 51, 220-228. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2016.08.032

 Fryer, L. K., Van den Broeck, A. Ginns, P. & Nakao, K. (2016). Understanding students’ instrumental goals, motivation deficits and achievement: Through the Lens of a latent profile analysis. Psychologica Belgica, 56, 226–243, doi: 10.5334/pb.265

Fryer, L. K., Ginns, P., Walker, R. W., & Nakao, K. (2012). The adaptation and validation of the CEQ and the R-SPQ-2F to the Japanese tertiary environment. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 82, 549-563. doi: 10.1111/j.2044-8279.2011.02045.x

 

Educational Technology

Fryer, L. K. & Bovee, H. N. (2018). Staying motivated to e-learn: Person- and variable-centred perspectives on the longitudinal risks and support. Computers and Education. 120, 227-240 doi: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.01.006

Fryer, L. K., & Bovee, H. N. (2016). Supporting students’ motivation for e-learning assignments: Teachers matter on and offline. Internet and Higher Education. 30, 21-29. doi: 10.1016/j.iheduc.2016.03.003

Fryer, L. K., Bovee, H. N., & Nakao, K. (2014). E-learning: Reasons language students don't want to. Computers & Education, 74, 26-36. doi: 10.1016/j.compedu.2014.01.008

Fryer, L. K., & Carpenter, R. (2006). Bots as language learning tools. Language Learning and Technology, 10, 8-14. Permanent Online Location: llt.msu.edu/vol10num3/emerging/

 

Higher Education Teaching and Learning

 Fryer, L. K. & Gijbels, D. (2017). Student learning in higher education: Where we are and paths forward. Educational Psychology Review. 29, 199-203. doi: 10.1007/s10648-017-9415-5

 Fryer, L. K. (2017). (Latent) transitions to learning at university: A latent profile transition analysis of first-year Japanese students. Higher Education. 73, 519-537. doi: 10.1007/s10734-016-0094-9     

Fryer, L. K. (2017). Building bridges: Seeking structure and direction for motivated learning strategy models.Educational Psychology Review. 29, 325-344. doi: 10.1007/s10648-017-9405-7

 

ChatBots as Learning Partners

Fryer, L. K., Coniam, D., Carpenter, R., & Lăpușneanu, D. (2020). Bots for language learning now: Current and future directions. Language Learning & Technology, 24(2), 8–22. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10125/44719

Fryer, L. K., Thompson, A., Nakao, K., Howarth, M., & Gallacher, A. (2020). Supporting self-efficacy beliefs and interest as educational inputs and outcomes: Framing AI and Human partnered task experience. Learning and Individual Differences. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2020.101850

Fryer, L. K., Nakao, K. & Thompson, A. (2019). Chatbot learning partners: Connecting learning experiences, interest and competence. Computers in Human Behaviour. 93,279-289. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2018.12.023

 Fryer, L. K., Ainley, M., Thompson, A., Gibson, A., & Sherlock, Z. (2017). Stimulating and sustaining interest in a language course: An experimental comparison of Chatbot and Human task partners. Computers in Human Behavior, 75, 461-468. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2017.05.045

Fryer, L. K., & Carpenter, R. (2006). Bots as language learning tools. Language Learning and Technology, 10, 8-14. Permanent Online Location: llt.msu.edu/vol10num3/emerging/

 

Learning a New Language at School

Oga-Baldwin & Fryer, L. K. (2020). Profiles of language learning motivation: Are new and own languages different? Learning and Individual Differences.doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2020.101852

Oga-Baldwin, W. L. Q., Fryer, L. K. & Larson-Hall, J. (2019). The critical role of the individual in language education: New directions from the learning sciences. System. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2019.102118

Fryer, L. K. & Oga-Baldwin, W. (2019). Succeeding at junior high school: Students’ reasons, their reach and the teaching that h(inders)elps their grasp. Contemporary Educational Psychology. 59  doi: /10.1016/j.cedpsych.2019.101778. 

Fryer, L. K. & Ainley, M. (2019). Supporting interest in a study domain: A longitudinal test of the interplay between interest, utility-value, and competence beliefs. Learning and Instruction. 60, 252-262. doi:10.1016/j.learninstruc.2017.11.002

Oga-Baldwin, W. L. Q. & Fryer, L. K. (2018). Schools can improve motivational quality: Profile transitions across early foreign language learning experiences. Motivation and Emotion. 42. 527-545. doi: 10.1007/s11031-018-9681-7

Fryer. L. K., Carter, P., Ozono, S., Nakao, K., & Anderson, C. J. (2013) Instrumental reasons for studying in compulsory English courses: I didn’t come to university to study English, so why should I? Innovation in Language Learning and Teaching. 8, 239-256 doi: 10.1080/17501229.2013.835314

 

Enhancing Self-report Methods

Fryer, L. K. & Nakao, K. (2020). The Future of Survey Self-report: An experimental test of  Likert, VAS, Slide, & “Swipe” touch interfaces. FrontLine Learning Research. doi: https://doi.org/10.14786/flr.v8i2.502 

Fryer, L. K. & Dinsmore, D. L. (2020). The Promise and Pitfalls of Self-report: Development, research design and analysis issues, and multiple methods. Frontline Learning Research. doi: https://doi.org/10.14786/flr.v8i3.623

 

The Power of Formative Assessment

Leenknecht, M. Loyens, S. &  Fryer, L. K. (2020). Formative assessment as practice: The Role of students’ motivation.Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education. doi:  https://doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2020.1765228

 

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BOOK CHAPTERS:

Oga-baldwin, W. & Fryer, L. K. (in press). Engagement growth in language learning classrooms A latent growth analysis of emotional, behavioral and cognitive engagement in Japanese elementary school classrooms. Tokyo: Multilingual Matters.

Dinsmore, D. L. Fryer, L. K., & Parkinson, M. M. (2020). Introduction: What are strategies? In D. L. Dinsmore, L. K. Fryer, & M. M. Parkinson (Eds.), Handbook of strategies and strategic processing: Conceptualization, measurement, and analysis. New York: Routledge.

Fryer, L. K.; Lee, S.; Shum, A. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In Oxford Bibliographies in Education. Ed. Anne Hynds. New York: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246

Fryer, L. K., & Shum, A. (2020). Person-centered approaches to explaining students’ cognitive processing strategies. In D. L. Dinsmore, L. K. Fryer, & M. M. Parkinson (Eds.), Handbook of strategies and strategic processing: Conceptualization, measurement, and analysis. New York: Routledge.

Fryer, L. K., Larson-Hall, J., & Stewart, J. (2018). Experimental and longitudinal advances in language learning research. In A. Phakiti, P. D. Costa, L. Plonsky, & S. Starfield (Eds.), Palgrave Handbook of Applied Linguistics Research Methodology. New York: Palgrave.

Oga-baldwin, W. & Fryer, L. K. (2018). Growing Up in the Walled Garden: Motivation, Engagement, and the Japanese Educational Experience. In G. Liem & S. Tan. (Eds), Student Motivation, Engagement, and Growth: Asian Insights. New York: Routledge.

Others

Interested in changing the world?


If you are a teacher with academic inclinations or a psychology graduate with applied interests – and a penchant for research – get in touch?

I am looking for a few good Ph.D. students interested in “interest”! My programme focuses on the development and application of “interest” in a broad range of contexts: from middle, secondary and tertiary education to the workplace.

If this sparks your curiosity, get in touch, send along your CV and let’s have a conversation. There are a number of pathways to a fully subsidised Ph.D. at the University of Hong Kong for foreign and Hong Kong students.

The first and most prestigious is the Hong Kong PhD. Fellowship Scheme. There are 240 awarded a year. They are competitive, but if you have a strong academic record and experiences that you think set you apart, then it is well worth a shot. The second avenue is a HKU Postgraduate Scholarship. The great thing is, if you apply for the Hong Kong Ph.D. Fellowship Scheme, you are automatically considered for the second one as well.

Check out the webpages, consider this path to a Ph.D. at The University of Hong Kong and a first step toward a research career in the area of human interest.

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