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Unsettling Beliefs for Pre-service Teachers

Workshops
Date January 19, 2018
Time 12:45 - 14:00
Chair
Dr Margaret Lo
Speaker
Dr Loraine McKay
Venue
Room 205, Runme Shaw Building, HKU
Media
Registration

Workshop:

Unsettling Beliefs for Pre-service Teachers

 

Dr Loraine McKay

School of Education and Professional Studies

Griffith University

 

January 19, 2018 (Friday)

Room 205, Runme Shaw Building, HKU

12:45 – 14:00

Chair: Dr Margaret Lo

 

Abstract:

“I don’t feel prepared to teach students with disabilities.” This admission, made by many preservice teachers, is both troubling and revealing. As teacher educators, we continue to wrestle with and contest hegemonic assumptions that certain ‘kinds’ of students are inherently problematic, and beyond the capacities of teachers to teach. Given that teachers’ values, beliefs and feelings determine their practice, providing preservice teachers with opportunities to critically examine their assumptions is an essential part of teacher education, and fundamental to fostering students’ sense of belonging and learning in schools.

Learning to be a teacher is complex. Understanding the world, how it operates and how teachers can provide the very best opportunities for those they support and represent is not understood by completing a set of learning tasks or learning a set of processes. Becoming a teacher, who supports inclusive ideals, requires engagement with complex ideas and problem-based activities that are further understood through critical reflection undertaken independently, and with others. In this workshop participants will undertake a range of individual and group activities designed to support the development of professional identity as an inclusive educator. The aim is to identify the beliefs and assumptions preservice teachers bring with them into teaching to recognise how they may influence preservice teachers’ future practice.

 

About the speaker:

Dr Loraine McKay is a lecturer in teacher education, at the School of Education and Professional Studies, Griffith University. She aims to understand and develop practices that teachers employ as they work to enhance learning outcomes of all students. In particular she is also keenly interested in how preservice teachers develop their identity as inclusive educators. Developing a teacher identity whilst undertaking the preservice training has been shown to impact on how teachers manage the transition into the profession and their capacity to meet the challenges of 21st century classrooms.

Her research explores the structural, political, contextual, moral and ethical constraints that can sometimes limit the practices of teachers and threaten equitable and quality educational opportunities for students. More recently her research has focussed specifically on how these factors impact on learning to read and the teaching of reading to early adolescents, and the influence on teacher identity.

 

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