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Collaborative Professionalism: The Next Paradox of Educational Change

Seminars
Date February 21, 2018
Time 12:30 - 14:00
Speaker
Professor Andy Hargreaves
Venue
Room 205, Runme Shaw Building, HKU
Media
Registration

Collaborative Professionalism: The Next Paradox of Educational Change

Professor Andy HARGREAVES
Thomas More Brennan Chair
Lynch School of Education, Boston College, USA 

February 21, 2018 (Wednesday)
12:30 – 14:00
Room 205, Runme Shaw Building, HKU

Abstract:
Professionals have long been regarded as autonomous. Collaboration is about laboring together in solidarity. Collaborative professionalism is therefore as much of an oxymoron as professional capital. What is important about it? Why does it matter for educational change? 

In this lecture, based on his Spring 2018 book, Andy Hargreaves draws on his 2017 research on different designs for collaborating in the US and four other countries, including Hong Kong which he researched during his last visit. Whether teachers should collaborate is no longer really an issue. Any profession worthy of its name today depends upon people sharing their knowledge and expertise. The key question now is what are better and worse ways to collaborate? How do we design collaboration? What do we know about professional learning communities, lesson study, or school networks, for example, when they are at their best? And how do we take promising designs from one place and use them effectively in another? These are the questions Andy will raise as he explores this new paradox of educational change.

About the Speaker:
Andy Hargreaves is the Brennan Chair in the Lynch School of Education at Boston College and Distinguished Visiting Professor at The University of Hong Kong. He is President of the International Congress of School Effectiveness and Improvement, Founding Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Professional Capital and Community, and Adviser in Education to the Premier of Ontario and the First Minister of Scotland. His Outstanding Writing Awards include the 2015 Grawemeyer Award in Education for Professional Capital (with Michael Fullan), as well as awards from the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, the American Educational Research Association, the American Libraries Association and the International Leadership Association. He has been honored with the 2016 Horace Mann Award in the US and the Robert Owen Award in Scotland for services to public education. He has been ranked by Education Week in the top 10 scholars with most influence on US education policy debate. In 2015, Boston College gave him its Excellence in Teaching with Technology Award. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

~ ALL ARE WELCOME ~
 

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